Do I need camping tyres for my motorhome?

by chris sanders on 9th May 2012

which Tyres

 

I recently did an article on the importance of checking your motorhome tyres before the holidays which can be seen here:  But what should you do if they need changing? Which tyre should you buy for your motorhome? Let’s investigate!

If your vehicle was bought new then there is a good chance that it was supplied with a specific camping tyre. Continental, Michelin & Pirelli all make these camper specific products although Michelin & Continental are certainly the most common. If you take a look at your current tyres and you may see wrote on the sidewall; Continental Vanco Camper, Michelin Agilis Camping or XC Camping – these are all ‘proper’ motorhome tyres.

So what are camping tyres?

These tyres are designed specifically for use on motorhomes, the main difference is that they have tougher sidewalls. This toughness helps in 2 ways, firstly they are more suitable to run at higher pressures that are required for motorhomes, and secondly the rigidity reduces tyre movement and stops the vehicle from swaying around, particularly whilst cornering.  There are also subtle differences in the tread compound which gives the tyres improved grip on wet surfaces and some differences in construction that make the tyre more resistant to abrasions & impacts.

Can I use normal van tyres?

Absolutely, it is still legal and safe to use regular van tyres as long as the load rating is high enough to carry the weight of the vehicle. By using a standard van tyre you will of course not benefit from the features detailed above. The main reason people fit standard van tyres is because of the cost implications of fitting motorhome tyres. The camper equivalent tends to be about 15% more which can equate to upwards of £60 a set. Personally I think the cost is justified and worth the additional cost.

Which brand?

As mentioned Continental & Michelin are the most common motorhome tyres fitted by manufacturers. Michelin tend to be the more expensive of the two and many purchasers have an idea that they are the best manufacturer. Well when it comes to camper tyres this doesn’t appear to be the case! There are a number of tyre tests that have been done specifically with motorhomes and Continental consistently come out on top. They always have dramatically shorter braking distances than all the other products and they are often praised on their stability.

A note on availability

When it comes to changing your tyres I would also advise starting to investigate the process long before any trips away. During peak times of the year (April, May) some camper tyres can become scarce so please allow plenty of time. If you can’t see what you need online give a reputable dealer a call to check expected dates for you.

Happy camping

Have a look at Tyremen’s great winter tyres packages. Or ring 0845 807 808 for more info.

 

Max pressure note – Feb 14

Off the back of a few comments about max pressures on the Vanco Camper tyre I thought it would be useful to clarify that the 215/70R15 tyre can be inflated to 80psi when using on motorhomes. There is a confusing message on the side wall that states max pressure 69psi but this is just intended for regular commercial use. The following graphic can also be found on the side of the tyre which demonstrates that then when using on a motorhome this max pressure can be rai

sed to 5.5 bar, which is equal to 80psi – I hope this helps.

max pressure on camper tyres

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winter Tyres

Updated 12/04/2018

Going away without checking the tyres on your motorhome could be a recipe for disaster. Pivotal to the smooth handling of your camper, tyres that haven’t been looked after, inspected or tested could bring your holiday crashing down around you.
By simply giving your tyres the once over, you’ll avoid the pain of a breakdown. However…. if they do need changing, what sort of tyres should you buy?

What are the differences between Motorhome Tyres and Normal Tyres?

Motorhome tyres or Camping tyres are those designed specifically for mobile homes. They have several important features which make them a necessity for campers:

  1.  One of the most important qualities of Motorhome tyres is their ability to carry heavy loads. They have a much higher weight carrying capacity than  normal tyres and van tyres. Car tyres can typically take a load of up to 500kg with van tyres able to withstand 700kg. Even smaller motorhomes, weighing around 2700kg, can put loads of 675kg on each tyre. This will certainly burst normal car tyres at speed. Some motorhomes require tyres that can take a maximum load of over 1200kg on each tyre.
    Tyremen tip-  All tyres have their maximum load at maximum pressure moulded into the sidewall of each tyre – often known as the Load Index
  2. Due to the shear load, motorhome tyres need to withstand high pressure. A typical car tyre is limited to a maximum pressure of around 40 psi compared to a light commercial vehicle tyres which are inflated to around 65 psi. Specialist motorhome tyres can be inflated to 80psi.
    Tyremen tip – Like all tyres, motorhome tyres need to be inflated correctly. Incorrect tyre pressures can have an adverse affect on handling, wear out more quickly, increase fuel consumption and cause blowouts which may lead to accidents. Always check your vehicle/chassis handbook and inflate your tyres to the correct pressure. Remember, the volume of pressurised air within the tyre determines the load the tyre can withstand. Reducing the tyre pressure reduces the load capacity of the tyre.
  3. The tougher sidewalls on camping tyres bring two major advantages. Firstly, they’re better at running at the high pressures motorhomes demand and secondly their rigidity gives the vehicle a more solid base, which prevents it from moving around and swaying.
  4. You’ll also see differences in tread compound. Tread compound is important for grip in poor weather conditions. It also makes your motorhome better at dealing with wet campsites, country lanes and heavy impact.

Can you use normal van tyres on your motorhome? and more importantly, should you?

It’s perfectly legal to use van tyres for motorhomes on UK roads. However, the load rating must be high enough to carry the weight of the vehicle. Standard van tyres won’t give you any of the benefits of camping tyres, as described above.
Camper tyres are 15% more expensive than standard van tyres. For obvious reasons, this is why many motorhome owners use standard van tyres instead.
However, the major benefits of safety, wear and tear and fuel savings more than make up the extra cost.

What about tyre brands?

The most common motorhome tyres are Michelin, Continental and Pirelli which are usually fitted by manufacturers on new motorhomes. 2008 tyre tests showed that Continental tyres were the top performers, known for their stability and superior braking distances. However, with many new product launches from all three brands, we believe that there really isn’t much in it anymore.

 

Pirelli Chrono Camper

Pirelli’s Chrono Camper is capable of increased pressures to handle the weight of the motorhome. This tyre tread has a high resistance to wear and tear, lots of great road grip and stability due to strengthened side walls. New improved rubber mixtures and tread pattern has also improved the excellent overall adhesion.

Common Sizes and Prices:

225/75R16 (116R) £134.10

215/75R16 (113R) £

Michelin Agilis Camping Tyre

The qualities of new Agilis Camping tyre from Michelin include long tread life, enhanced safety performance and reduced fuel consumption. Reduced CO2 emissions together with 20% more mileage means this is one of the greenest camper tyres available. With reinforced rubber compounds and dual-casing architecture allows for higher tyre pressure and superior wet grip performance, perfect for campsites and wet fields. The Michelin Agilis Camper is a firm favourite for many motorhome enthusiasts.

Michelin Agilis Camping Common Sizes:

195/75R16 107Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

215/70R15 109Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

215/75R16 113Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

225/65R16 112Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

225/70R15 112Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

225/75R16 116Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

225/75R16 118R MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING 

 

Continental Vanco Camper

When it comes to camper tyres, the tests demonstrate that the Continental VancoCamper tyres have consistently out-performed their competitors in the past and have superior braking distances.
As campervans and motorhomes have become better equipped, they’ve also increased in weight. The Continental Vanco Camper is they tyre built specifically to withstand those changes. It’s famous for its stability, robust construction and improved durability. Capable of up to 80psi it is far superior to a normal van tyre, the VancoCamper is by far our most popular camping tyre at the moment.

Continental Vanco Camping Common Sizes:

195/75R16 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 107R

215/70R15 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 109R

215/75R16 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 116R

225/65R16 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 112R

225/75R16 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 116R

235/65R16 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 115R

 

So are Camping Tyres Necessary?

To answer the original question, no, camping tyres aren’t necessary. There is nothing compelling you to purchase these specialist tyres. You won’t be looked down upon for using van tyres instead. However, you will be losing out in terms of value for money.

There’s also a noticeable difference in the driving experience when you opt for specialist tyres. If you’re a regular camper, it’s definitely worth investing. You’ll certainly be thankful when you’re at full weight capacity and you need that little bit of extra support from your wheels.

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{ 37 comments… read them below or add one }

Gordon Edwards March 30, 2013 at 8:09 pm

Good sensible comments and advice, My local tyre fitter commented that he sees a lot of Michelin camper tyres with cracked and split wall. Mine are!
I believe they are all made in China.

Reply

Which Tyres April 2, 2013 at 10:34 am

I would be very surprised if they were coming from China, as far as I’m aware all Michelin tyres are European made! All brands of van tyre are prone to cracking on motorhomes as they generally sit throughout the winter months not being used and are often quite old. Phill

Reply

derek April 26, 2013 at 7:25 pm

i have hankook tyres on and they have been really gone to town on the side walls i also have goodyear cargo tyres twice the age no cracking on them hankooks 3 years old got to the stage where they have got to go loads of tread but side walls gone

Reply

Which Tyres April 29, 2013 at 3:03 pm

Surprising to hear! Both of these would be standard van tyres rather than Camper tyres which may have an impact as they are not designed to take the higher pressures. For those reading it may be worth noting that other things that can cause cracking include running at incorrect pressures and chemical based cleaning products!

Reply

Mari June 12, 2013 at 12:21 am

Do you mind if I quote a few of your articles as long as I provide credit
and sources back to your blog? My blog is in the very same niche as yours and my visitors would certainly benefit from some of the information
you present here. Please let me know if this ok with you.
Thanks!

Reply

Which Tyres June 26, 2013 at 8:41 am

Hi Mari,

Yeah that sounds great :)

Thanks
WhichTyres

Reply

Jay September 23, 2013 at 11:01 pm

Also the fact that camping tyres are also legal to travel across Europe in the winter months whilst van tyres are not! Everyone seems to miss this point. Camping tyres are m&s as well as being it’s mentioned above by others.

Reply

Which Tyres September 24, 2013 at 8:11 am

Good point well made Sir!

Reply

COLIN ROSS January 13, 2014 at 5:41 pm

Pardon my ignorance what does the comment mean in relation to camping
tyres, being M&S.

Reply

Which Tyres January 14, 2014 at 9:12 am

Hi Colin,

M & S stands for mud and snow, and in theory the tyres are able to cope with driving on these surfaces. However this does not make them a true snow/winter tyre, but it you were driving in mainland Europe and the country you were in mandated snow tyres then this marking would suffice in proving suitability.

Reply

davlins March 10, 2014 at 11:36 am

Are you sure? Surely It is only the Michelin Agillis Camper which has the M+S marking. The Continental Vanco Camper Tyre does not – not sure about the Pirelli .

Reply

Which Tyres March 11, 2014 at 2:01 pm

That’s right the Continental do NOT have M&S markings.

Reply

Sriram December 11, 2013 at 2:20 pm

Which are the top 5 Motorhome tire brands in Europe? Can you pls advice me the best dealer in Europe?

Reply

Ian Coldbeck February 6, 2014 at 3:48 pm

Hi, I have just had two new Continental Vanco tyres fitted on the rear axle of my Motorhome, I have the same on the front. At the same time I asked for new valves to be fitted as the old ones were losing air. I had the front valves relpaced also.
I asked the tyre fitter to inflate the tyres in accordance with the label on the inside of the door, this was front 72.5 psi and rear 79.5 psi, however the manufacturer maximum allowable psi on these Motorhome tyres is only 69.
The point the tyre fitter made was you should always inflate tyres according to the tyre manufacturers figure stamped on the tyre and never exceed it. Do not just blindly use the vehicle manufacturer label. My vehicle is a 3500kg Peugeot Boxer with Alloy wheel rims. I hope this is of interest to your readers.

Reply

Which Tyres February 10, 2014 at 2:04 pm

Hi Ian,

Continental Camper tyres are designed to run at the higher pressures needed on campervans, did you buy standard Conti Vanco or the Vanco Camper?

Cheers,

Phill

Reply

Barry Hollingsworth March 6, 2014 at 8:37 am

I am currently trying to determine which tyres to buy for my Autotrail.
Fiat confirm my tyres should be inflated to 79.5psi.
Autotrail confirm same.
Continental confirm tyres (camper) should not be inflated above 69psi indicated on tyre walls.
On the face of it, appears that vehicle was sold to us new with unsuitable tyres, not fit for purpose. Currently awaiting comments from Fiat.

Reply

Which Tyres March 6, 2014 at 10:32 am

Hi there,

This is really good point to bring up on this post thank you!

The 215/70R15 Conti Vanco Camper is capable on running at pressures up to 80psi. If you look at one of the tyres it does state max pressure 69psi in fairly prominent text. This actually just relates to standard commercial vehicle use. If you look a bit more closely you will see a picture of a motorhome and it then states that the tyre is designed to run up to 5.5 bar (which is 80psi) when used on motorhomes.

I hope this helps? Best prices on these at the moment are available fro Jungle Tyres: http://www.jungletyres.co.uk/product/12509/215/70r15-(109r)-vanco-camper

Reply

Barry Hollingsworth March 6, 2014 at 8:43 am

Ps to my previous comment.
My concern is one of safety and insurance.
Insurance companies would be quick to avoid a pay out in the event of an incident, if they discovered the vehicle was being operated at incorrect tyre pressures, or operating outside of ‘design’. 79.5 psi exceeds tyre design. 69 psi does not meet fiat design.

Reply

Loz March 7, 2014 at 5:33 pm

Hi there,
Thanks so much for the good clear advice and intel re what type of tyres to replace the original tyres now approaching the MOT limit. The local retailer said that any van tyre would suffice. So glad that I took the time to read the advice that camper tyres are not your average tyre.
I will definitely stick with the Continental Vanco Camper tyres as fitted by manufacturer.

Reply

larry April 19, 2014 at 4:07 pm

how do I find out the age of a vanco 215/70/15 CP TYRE??

Reply

Which Tyres April 22, 2014 at 12:18 pm

You need to look for the DOT code on the tyre. It is an oblong (rounded edged) box on just one side of the tyre that contains 4 numbers.
Will be something like 2510 which means the tyre was produced in the 25th week of 2010.

I hope this helps, Phill.

Reply

Jim Yates June 18, 2014 at 9:04 pm

I have just started investigating replacement tyres for my 3.5t, 5year old Boxer motorhome, my local tyre man has looked into the availability of camping tyres. He informed me he was being given advice that if the van would be visiting Europe it would need a higher spec tyre than for England? He is making further investigations with his suppliers.

After reading the above comments I will be asking him to Look at the Continental Vanco Camper Tyre

Thanks Jim

Reply

Stephen Romanski July 13, 2014 at 9:48 am

Just to add something else to the debate. I have a fiat impala that has an upgraded gvw of
3850k. I bought it secondhand with C rated tyres on – recommended pressure 4.5bar. I have had 2 blow-outs on the rear off side on the motorway. Not a nice experience! The second . tyre had done minimum millege over 2 years. Reading all the threads it is now obvious that I need camping rated tyres that can cope with the vagaries of motorhome driving. The prevoius advice given was that “these things happen”. This may well be the case, however, twice is no coincidence!

Reply

david wilsher August 12, 2014 at 6:53 pm

Kwik Fit told me as long as the rating is the same, then the tyre is suitable for my Motorhome. I have had fitted 2 Goodyear Cargo 215/75 R160 rated 113/111. With only 36.000 miles but 9 years on the vehicle Michelin Camper I could see some distress on the sides. (like sunburn flaking on your skin) Have I made a mistake?
We will be off on a 3000 mile trek this September to Croatia and across to Italy.
The rear I will be changing this week to Michelin Camper tyres. Should I put them on the front and the Goodyear on the rear. Fiat Swift Kontiki

Reply

pete September 19, 2015 at 4:15 pm

9yr old tyres ARE DANGEROUS on anything but especially so on a heavy vehicle which demands stronger tyres. Tyres are designed to last upto around 5yrs max regardless what treat is left. Its lack of use, like on anything, that kills them. Get them all changed you only live once. Its a reminder to others too. Get saving for your next set of tyres as soon as you have bought them. £10 a month is a small price to pay for peace of mind. Not just yours but any potential victims of poor choices as well.

Reply

Peter linley October 6, 2015 at 4:10 pm

Bought a new Neuvo (Peugeot boxer)in April and it came with 72psi in front and 79psi rear. Personally I felt the vehicle to be unsafe, bouncing about with hardly any rubber touching the road so I contacted Peugeot…no reply contact autosleepers and they said it was my responsibility to get information on tyre pressures and I should contact Continental (VancoCamper tyres). They said load it up as much as possible go to a weigh bridge and send us front and rear axle weights. This I did and they sent me a chart and said the correct tyre pressure should be 47.1 psi front and 68.8 rear. It is no wonder it felt uncomfortable! I am getting around 29mpg. The tyres remain cool after a long run and I feel a darn site safer and the only down side is dashboard constantly flashing flat front tyres! Peugeot will reset the pressure sensors for £50 ( on this vehicle you cannot reset the sensors yourself but then that is another gripe )

Reply

Dave C. February 25, 2016 at 11:54 pm

I have owned various Motorhomes over the years and always replaced the tyres, when needed, with ordinary van tyres. I have ordinary Michelin 8 ply commercial tyres on my Motorhome at the moment and find them absolutely stable and safe whether in the rain or dry.
I have never had a blow out in over 50 years of driving and that’s by keeping my tyres properly inflated and NOT exceeding the tyre manufacturers pressure recommendations. Remember the word “Recommendation”. Those driving with over inflated tyres should drop the pressure down to the tyre manufacturers recommendation and they will have a much smoother ride and be less likely to have a blow out. If a tyre is inflated too high it is more likely to blow when it touches an obstruction in the road.
Just to conclude, does anyone think that white van man who passes you at wharp! speeds is driving on 8 ply tyres that are substandard because they don’t have Camper or Motorhome wrtiten on them. I don’t think so, but waste your money if you wish.
JMHO!

Reply

Joe March 13, 2016 at 3:57 pm

I am with Dave C on this, what is the difference between a 3.5 ton van and a 3.5 ton motorhome? The main one to me is the van will be on the road doing fat more mileage and normally at a far higher speed than a motorhome so why does the van not need ‘camping’ tyres to make the van more stable and safer.

Reply

Graham N April 7, 2016 at 11:32 pm

Like the last two comments. I googled camping tyre to see what all the fuss is about.
Trying to get my head around two vans, one camping, one courier, both identical & weigh 3.5t.
I have a new Fiat, GVM 4.05t. At weigh bridge it weighed 3.6t, about 50/50 front & back axle.
Went to local tyre dealer & asked what PSI did he recommend. He went & looked up the book & came back with 65PSI all round & then asked what did it say on the door (a legality here in Aust.) -on the door it says 65 front & 70 rear. I run 65 all round, but not happy with the thumping the tyres give over modest bumps. Guess its from the more solid wall in the camping tyre. Tyres are Michelin 225/75 x 16. With this pressure get incredible milage ie 9.5l/100km.

Reply

Tribsa April 24, 2016 at 7:53 am

Interesting topic.
The problem is that we are not being specific.
Motorhome:- What does that mean! There are light,heavy, big and small motorhomes.

What counts is how much weight each tyre on the van is carrying.
If a tyre is carrying a high load the tyre needs to be inflated to a higher pressure to maintain its designed shape.
A higher pressure tyre needs to be stronger (presumably that means stronger sidewalls as part of a stronger carcass).

So the designation Camper should mean a tyre that is stronger and can be inflated to a higher pressure.

So what we need to know is how heavy our motorhome is (preferably what each axle weight is). Then we use this information to decide what tyre buy.

If the motorhome is light (small panel van) most likely tyre is a normal van tyre. Conversely if the motorhome is heavy (large coach built motorhome) a high pressure tyre (this could be a tyre known as Camper).

Reply

chris sanders May 6, 2016 at 11:03 am

Hello Tribsa,

You make a very good point, their is lots of uncertainty on what motorhome owners actually have.

Below is a link that explains the load and speed rating which is very useful when you know your vehicles weight.

http://whichtyres.com/load-and-speed-rating-explained/

Chris sanders

Reply

Jay June 21, 2016 at 11:46 am

Interesting thread here on tyre choice (the premium for camper specific vs the potential cost saving by using standard van tyres) and as someone who spent a very long time reviewing/reading various forum threads my logic ended up as follows…

1. Tyres from a respected manufacturer that are designed for the use that they put to (campervan) vs more general tyres (i.e. I wouldn’t put moped tyres on my motorbike even if they did fit!-) would be my preference.

2. The experts view. Tyreman states above that he believes ” the cost is justified and worth the additional cost” + my local commercial tyre specialist rang his wholesaler (whilst I was debating camper vs standard van tyres) and the reply was quite specific “camper van tyres are designed and manufactured specifically for campervans” so by now I was leaning towards campervan tyres…

BUT the “clincher for me” (in the campervan vs van tyres debate!-) was reminding myself to think about the premium for campervan specific tyres when considering that overall value of my “van” + the usual ongoing costs to insure/service/fuel/campsite fee’s etc and suddenly the premium (in my case £20 per tyre and I changed all 4) was suddenly well worth paying.

FYI I chose Continental Vanco Camper and the positive difference in handling etc (over the previous van tyres) is noticeable but I assume I would say that as I’ve now spent my money…!-)

Reply

Roger December 19, 2016 at 10:36 am

I fitted continental vanco tyres to our autocruise panel van conversion. I weighted the van (fully loaded) at a weighbridge and contacted continental for advice regarding pressures. With the weights given (1.7 t front, 1.6t back) they adviced 47 psi all round.
The van feels much better on the road, smoother ride and more stable on bends, than it did with the previous motor home tyres set to the 60/65 psi recommended on the door plate. Autocruise do say you can reduce tyre presumes if the weight allows.

Reply

peter swindlehurst February 15, 2017 at 1:00 pm

mitchelin agilis green told are new camper van tyres by mitchelin by my tyre supplier ? like your comments

Reply

Pete O April 24, 2017 at 6:08 pm

I have been reading lots of comments on tyres fitted to motorhomes. The main difference with camper specific tyres compared to normal van tyres is that a normal van does not constantly run at near maximum weight for the tyre. They are normally loaded to maximum for a lot less than 25% of their life taking into account most are parked up unloaded though the night. A motorhome runs nearly fully loaded for most of tyres life & in some cases over that from what I have noticed. This is why you need specific tyres with reinforced tyre walls & different rubber compounds to cope with the extra hard work they do for 100% of their life. Don’t scrimp on tyres! Get the correct ones for the job. Make my life easier as I am one of the guys who picks up the pieces of your motorhomes & campers after tyre blowouts & risks his life on the hard shoulder of the motorways sorting out these vehicles. (Bit of a rant there sorry).

Reply

Michael Wills April 12, 2018 at 12:17 pm

I recently sent a email to a on line tyre company called Allopeus asking if the Nokian weatherproof tyres would be suitable for my Motor home. This is the reply I got back.
Hello Mr Wills

After your return, I inform you that the Nokian tire is not for campers.

All vehicles in circulation from 2003 must be fitted with tires with special marking CP camper.

You will find below the Michelin model that has marking M + S:

MICHELIN-AGILIS-CAMPING-215-70r15-109-q-109-q

I invite you to check the load index and speed if they match before ordering.

We remain at your disposal to answer all your questions.

Has anyone else heard of this?

Reply

chris sanders April 12, 2018 at 1:36 pm

Going away without checking the tyres on your motorhome could be a recipe for disaster. Pivotal to the smooth handling of your camper, tyres that haven’t been looked after, inspected or tested could bring your holiday crashing down around you.
By simply giving your tyres the once over, you’ll avoid the pain of a breakdown. However…. if they do need changing, what sort of tyres should you buy?

What are the differences between Motorhome Tyres and Normal Tyres?
Motorhome tyres or Camping tyres are those designed specifically for mobile homes. They have several important features which make them a necessity for campers:

One of the most important qualities of Motorhome tyres is their ability to carry heavy loads. They have a much higher weight carrying capacity than normal tyres and van tyres. Car tyres can typically take a load of up to 500kg with van tyres able to withstand 700kg. Even smaller motorhomes, weighing around 2700kg, can put loads of 675kg on each tyre. This will certainly burst normal car tyres at speed. Some motorhomes require tyres that can take a maximum load of over 1200kg on each tyre.

Tyremen tip- All tyres have their maximum load at maximum pressure moulded into the sidewall of each tyre – often known as the Load Index

Due to the shear load, motorhome tyres need to withstand high pressure. A typical car tyre is limited to a maximum pressure of around 40 psi compared to a light commercial vehicle tyres which are inflated to around 65 psi. Specialist motorhome tyres can be inflated to 80psi.

Tyremen tip – Like all tyres, motorhome tyres need to be inflated correctly. Incorrect tyre pressures can have an adverse affect on handling, wear out more quickly, increase fuel consumption and cause blowouts which may lead to accidents. Always check your vehicle/chassis handbook and inflate your tyres to the correct pressure. Remember, the volume of pressurised air within the tyre determines the load the tyre can withstand. Reducing the tyre pressure reduces the load capacity of the tyre.

The tougher sidewalls on camping tyres bring two major advantages. Firstly, they’re better at running at the high pressures motorhomes demand and secondly their rigidity gives the vehicle a more solid base, which prevents it from moving around and swaying.

You’ll also see differences in tread compound. Tread compound is important for grip in poor weather conditions. It also makes your motorhome better at dealing with wet campsites, country lanes and heavy impact.
Can you use normal van tyres on your motorhome? and more importantly, should you?
It’s perfectly legal to use van tyres for motorhomes on UK roads. However, the load rating must be high enough to carry the weight of the vehicle. Standard van tyres won’t give you any of the benefits of camping tyres, as described above.
Camper tyres are 15% more expensive than standard van tyres. For obvious reasons, this is why many motorhome owners use standard van tyres instead.
However, the major benefits of safety, wear and tear and fuel savings more than make up the extra cost.

What about tyre brands?
The most common motorhome tyres are Michelin, Continental and Pirelli which are usually fitted by manufacturers on new motorhomes. 2008 tyre tests showed that Continental tyres were the top performers, known for their stability and superior braking distances. However, with many new product launches from all three brands, we believe that there really isn’t much in it anymore.

Pirelli Chrono Camper
Pirelli’s Chrono Camper is capable of increased pressures to handle the weight of the motorhome. This tyre tread has a high resistance to wear and tear, lots of great road grip and stability due to strengthened side walls. New improved rubber mixtures and tread pattern has also improved the excellent overall adhesion.

Common Sizes and Prices:

225/75R16 (116R) £134.10

215/75R16 (113R) £

Michelin Agilis Camping Tyre
The qualities of new Agilis Camping tyre from Michelin include long tread life, enhanced safety performance and reduced fuel consumption. Reduced CO2 emissions together with 20% more mileage means this is one of the greenest camper tyres available. With reinforced rubber compounds and dual-casing architecture allows for higher tyre pressure and superior wet grip performance, perfect for campsites and wet fields. The Michelin Agilis Camper is a firm favourite for many motorhome enthusiasts.

Michelin Agilis Camping Common Sizes:
195/75R16 107Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

215/70R15 109Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

215/75R16 113Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

225/65R16 112Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

225/70R15 112Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

225/75R16 116Q MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

225/75R16 118R MICHELIN AGILIS CAMPING

Continental Vanco Camper

When it comes to camper tyres, the tests demonstrate that the Continental VancoCamper tyres have consistently out-performed their competitors in the past and have superior braking distances.
As campervans and motorhomes have become better equipped, they’ve also increased in weight. The Continental Vanco Camper is they tyre built specifically to withstand those changes. It’s famous for its stability, robust construction and improved durability. Capable of up to 80psi it is far superior to a normal van tyre, the VancoCamper is by far our most popular camping tyre at the moment.

Continental Vanco Camping Common Sizes:
195/75R16 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 107R

215/70R15 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 109R

215/75R16 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 116R

225/65R16 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 112R

225/75R16 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 116R

235/65R16 CONTINENTAL VANCOCAMPER 115R

So are Camping Tyres Necessary?
To answer the original question, no, camping tyres aren’t necessary. There is nothing compelling you to purchase these specialist tyres. You won’t be looked down upon for using van tyres instead. However, you will be losing out in terms of value for money.

There’s also a noticeable difference in the driving experience when you opt for specialist tyres. If you’re a regular camper, it’s definitely worth investing. You’ll certainly be thankful when you’re at full weight capacity and you need that little bit of extra support from your wheels.

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